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Zone inspired personal artwork

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  17:49:16  30 April 2011
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Molecule
The Artist
(Resident)

 

 
On forum: 06/13/2007
Messages: 12371

---QUOTATION---

Mr Molecule,
I emailed you back.

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Still nothing, I am wondering about your comments on the last one.
  08:16:09  1 May 2011
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Don Reba
Bishop and Councilor of War
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On forum: 12/04/2002
Messages: 11731

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It's difficult to say, since I don't make drawings in one go. This one in several months or something.
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That explains the detail level. I usually keep my drawings under an hour. Speed is critically important in drawing.
  12:22:39  1 May 2011
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Molecule
The Artist
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On forum: 06/13/2007
Messages: 12371

---QUOTATION---

That explains the detail level. I usually keep my drawings under an hour. Speed is critically important in drawing.
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Not speed, patience is critical. Like every artist knows, never hasten artwork.
  14:22:01  1 May 2011
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Don Reba
Bishop and Councilor of War
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On forum: 12/04/2002
Messages: 11731
It depends on whether you are learning, working professionally, purely working on your portfolio, or creating a "masterpiece". In the first two cases hastening is very much necessary.
  14:28:38  1 May 2011
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Molecule
The Artist
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On forum: 06/13/2007
Messages: 12371
I agree with the class professionally, but disagree with first one in some way. If you mean with learning, following a course or training, that is true, else, no.
  14:40:11  1 May 2011
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Don Reba
Bishop and Councilor of War
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On forum: 12/04/2002
Messages: 11731
I think it is true for almost any kind of learning. If you can't draw quickly, then you can't draw. If you allow yourself unlimited trial and error, then you are not forcing yourself to improve.
  15:29:03  1 May 2011
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Racemate
Loner
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On forum: 02/11/2009
 

Message edited by:
Racemate
05/01/2011 15:29:23
Messages: 1260
Some thoughts on discussed topic by Mike Sibley which I quote on my deviantart page:

"Images then are of supreme importance to the brain, and matching to stored, standard symbols offers a very speedy classification system. However, as artists, this facility works against us, because our brains automatically overlay the images we see with a range of symbols. This effectively disables the ability to produce realistic drawing because the information gathered is so basic – and often inaccurate if the brain’s ‘guess’ was incorrect.

Fortunately, there are many ways of fooling the brain into letting go of the desire to match symbols, to classify, during the act of drawing. For example, working faster than you can think serves to disable the argumentative side of your brain, which struggles to keep up and then loses interest.

To learn to see what is really there and not what you think is there, you need to take your brain’s automatic reaction out of the equation. Believe me, learning to see correctly really is a hard lesson to learn but the best way involves fooling your brain into not recognizing the troublesome features."



Some artwork by Zen-Master:

http://fav.me/d3efzkj
http://fav.me/d3ca9a6
http://fav.me/d3c6p8a
  15:55:27  1 May 2011
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Molecule
The Artist
(Resident)

 

 
On forum: 06/13/2007
Messages: 12371
As amateurs, we have all the time we need to draw something or to get it done. To me, it's not the question if you can draw, it's the question if you can finish what you want.

Most of us don't have any kind of training and we often need trial and error to figure things out. Improvement is a result of it. There is no forcing, you gradually improve. That's with learning. Practice makes perfect.

I have seen the skill of artists here evolve over the years. And I like it.
  16:06:43  1 May 2011
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Derranged
Senior Resident
 

 
On forum: 04/12/2010
Messages: 1009

---QUOTATION---
Some thoughts on discussed topic by Mike Sibley which I quote on my deviantart page:

"Images then are of supreme importance to the brain, and matching to stored, standard symbols offers a very speedy classification system. However, as artists, this facility works against us, because our brains automatically overlay the images we see with a range of symbols. This effectively disables the ability to produce realistic drawing because the information gathered is so basic – and often inaccurate if the brain’s ‘guess’ was incorrect.

Fortunately, there are many ways of fooling the brain into letting go of the desire to match symbols, to classify, during the act of drawing. For example, working faster than you can think serves to disable the argumentative side of your brain, which struggles to keep up and then loses interest.

To learn to see what is really there and not what you think is there, you need to take your brain’s automatic reaction out of the equation. Believe me, learning to see correctly really is a hard lesson to learn but the best way involves fooling your brain into not recognizing the troublesome features."



Some artwork by Zen-Master:

http://fav.me/d3efzkj
http://fav.me/d3ca9a6
http://fav.me/d3c6p8a
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Those are awesome! I wonder if this is actually art for Stalker 2, but stalker 2 is called Stalker Southern Comfort! Who knows, it could just be a mod or something...
  17:53:59  1 May 2011
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Don Reba
Bishop and Councilor of War
(Moderator)

 

 
On forum: 12/04/2002
Messages: 11731

---QUOTATION---
As amateurs, we have all the time we need to draw something or to get it done. To me, it's not the question if you can draw, it's the question if you can finish what you want.
---END QUOTATION---


No one has all the time he needs. It is best to get the most out of the time we have.

---QUOTATION---
Most of us don't have any kind of training and we often need trial and error to figure things out. Improvement is a result of it. There is no forcing, you gradually improve. That's with learning. Practice makes perfect.
---END QUOTATION---


Trial and error is necessary, of course, but it has to be followed up with analysis. For myself, I set apart a fixed amount of time for a drawing and stop when its out. If I am not satisfied with the result, I figure out what I did wrong and then start this same drawing from a clean slate, again with a time limit. This seems to be quite helpful.
 
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